Cadbury Develops Heat Resistant Chocolate

I’d imagine that if someone time traveled to 2012 from 1912, they would be thoroughly disappointed to see that we still string wires up along roads, rely on oil for basically everything and have been unable to cure diseases. However, one thing that would seem like space age magic is melt resistant chocolate, which was recently developed by Cadbury and can survive over 3 hours in 104 degree heat:

In its official patent application, Cadbury states that it achieved the unique property by “refining the conched chocolate after the conching step.” Conching is a process in mass-market chocolate production in which a container is filled with metal beads that grind the ingredients such as cocoa butter, vegetable oils, milk and sugar. The Daily Mail explains that during the process, sugar particles are broken down into smaller pieces. This minimizes the amount of fat that covers them, which makes the bar less susceptible to heat.

The product will soon be available in locales with hellish temperatures, such as India and Brazil. However, it will not be coming to the UK (where Cadbury was founded). Why? Because the head of corporate affairs at Kraft Foods, who bought Cadbury in 2010, said it “simply would not sell” in the British market. He then went on to say “To be honest I don’t think any chocoholics would welcome this recipe because it would not taste as good as Dairy Milk.”

(via HuffPo)

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